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Precedent Exhibition, Artifact Analysis, and Signage Ideation

by on October 26, 2011

This was an exhibition by an alumni student of NYSID.  I found this space particularly inspirational in its use of light and staging.  Dramatic purple, neon lighting is buffered by white recess lighting that showers and backlights the product.  Hidden recess lighting above the drop down ceiling panel creates a majestic, soft flow of accent light.  Opaque and oblique partitions create a visually stimulating barrier within the space while still serving the function of displaying the shoe products.  The modular paneled wall, which looks to have some acoustical value, along with the ceiling create a somber contrast to the brightly lit space.  This offers visual relief from generic white washed walls while creating a focal point with the centered opaque partitions.

Artifact Analysis

Teapot, 1699–1700

French; Paris

Silver, wood

The teapot along with the coffee pot have oddly contrasting handles made out of wood, primarily to reduce heat transfer as silver is an incredible conductor.  Tea was never as monumental a custom as in England, and it never rose to the demand of coffee and chocolate in France but the relatively small size still reflects the high cost of tea.  Fine detail seem to accentuate around apertures at the spout and top, perhaps to enhance the areas where action occurs while the pot remain a simple vessel.

Coffeepot, 1756–57

Marked by François-Thomas Germain (French, 1726–1791)

French; Paris

Silver, wood

This coffeepot represents the fine craftsmanship of French silversmiths.  The dynamic curves accentuate movement as if the liquid is splashing from the outside or piercing through the silver.  Coffee leaves and berries adorn the top and mouth of the pot, reminding us that this work of art still holds a function.

Coffeepot, 1756–57

Marked by François-Thomas Germain (French, 1726–1791)

French; Paris

Silver, wood

This coffeepot represents the fine craftsmanship of French silversmiths.  The dynamic curves accentuate movement as if the liquid is splashing from the outside or piercing through the silver.  Coffee leaves and berries adorn the top and mouth of the pot, reminding us that this work of art still holds a function.

Signage Ideation

The basic idea here is abstraction of our topic fork, plate, table through diagrammatic shapes that form the basis of time, each working together as a kit of parts.

My personal contribution to the group will be a study of 17th century Baroque and Rococo dinnerware. I am a member of the artifact group and therefore will respond by considering the spatial layout of the exhibit as well as the duties of curating and labeling the artifacts to the best of my knowledge.
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